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Jean Song is Korean-American, from Michigan. Rishi Porecha is Indian-American, from California. Jean and Rishi met in college, in Philadelphia, a decade ago. Last December, they got married. A Korean-Indian-American wedding would have been interesting enough by itself, but in this story, the multiculturalism runs deeper.

In college, Jean met her best friend, Jaime Arafin, a Bangladeshi-American. That's also where they met Jaime's husband Andrew, a Lebanese-Canadian-American. There's more. Rishi's brother is in a relationship with an Asian-American, and their sister is engaged to a Frenchman.

If you're still following, then try this on for size: when Jean and Rishi got married, they asked Jaime's brother Shameel Arafin to photograph the wedding. Shameel asked his American girlfriend Dana to shoot the wedding with him. Together, they produced this set of photographs called, naturally, "American Wedding".

So not only are the bride and groom in a cross-cultural (or "biracial") relationship, so are their siblings, best friends, and the very photographers who shot the wedding.

There's even more. There were, in fact, two weddings - an Indian ceremony, for Rishi's Indian family, and a western ceremony, for Jean's Korean family. Both ceremonies were presided over by an American Hindu priest named Pundit Shukavak. So a Caucasian-American convert to Hinduism (who is, to be sure, a scholar of theology) married the same couple twice, once with fire and knots and ghee, and once with rings and kisses and suits and ties.

We hope these pictures communicate some of the energy, joy, beauty and irony inherent in a multicultural wedding. Happy Valentine's!"

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